Articles Posted in Supreme Court of Ohio

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In July 2015, the Delaware Joint Vocational School District Board of Education passed a resolution to submit a renewal levy to voters at the general election. On November 20, 2015, the Delaware County Board of Elections purported to certify the election result. The county auditor then delivered the abstract of tax rates to the tax commissioner to apply the reduction factors and calculate the tax rate for the school district. When the county auditor discovered that the Board of Elections had not certified the results of the levy using Form 5-U, however, the tax commissioner excluded the levy on the list of tax rates certified for collection to the county auditors in counties with territory in the school district, and the levy was not included on the property tax bills sent to property owners for the first half of tax year 2016. The school board brought this action in mandamus to compel the tax commissioner to apply the reduction factors and calculate the tax rates for the levy. The Supreme Court denied relief, holding that because no proper certification of the multicounty election was presented to the tax commissioner demonstrating that the tax was authorized to be levied, the commissioner did not have a clear legal duty to apply reduction factors and calculate tax rates for this levy. View "State ex rel. Delaware Joint Vocational School District Board of Education v. Testa" on Justia Law

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School Choice Ohio, Inc., a private nonprofit corporation that informs parents about educational opportunities for their children, sent a public-records request to Springfield City School District seeking information regarding students enrolled in the school in the district during the 2013-2014 academic year. Springfield denied the request based on a student-information policy it had adopted that required parental written consent before Springfield would release certain student information. School Choice filed a complaint seeking a writ of mandamus compelling Springfield to produce the requested information and to amend Springfield’s student-information policy. The Supreme Court granted in part and denied in part the complaint and ordered Springfield to provide the requested records that pertain to students whose parents had signed Springfield’s consent form and that fell within the categories of personally identifiable information identified in Springfield’s consent form, holding (1) School Choice had a clear legal right to access the personally identifiable information of Springfield’s students whose parents had consented to the release of the information; and (2) School Choice failed to establish a clear legal right to compel Springfield to amend its student-information policy. View "State ex rel. Sch. Choice Ohio, Inc. v. Cincinnati Pub. Sch. Dist." on Justia Law

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Several school districts filed complaints seeking reimbursement for retroactive reductions in school foundation funding. The State Board of Education of Ohio (the department) moved for judgment on the pleadings, arguing that it was insulated from liability. The trial court held that the General Assembly did not have the constitutional authority to adjust local school funding retrospectively. The Court of Appeals affirmed. The Supreme Court reversed, holding that the General Assembly had constitutional authority to retroactively reduce the amount of state funding allocated to local school districts and to immunize the department against the school districts’ legal claims. Remanded. View "Toledo City Sch. Dist. Bd. of Educ. v. State Bd. of Educ." on Justia Law